Technology

5G: mm-wave signals could power self-charging IoT devices

The problem is that vendors want 5G to be revolutionary and transformational, rather than orderly. Second, that need to seem revolutionary has pushed 5G stories to the boundaries of sensibility.To A 3D-printed antenna could turn high-frequency 5G signals into a wireless power source, potentially eliminating the need for batteries in low-power IoT devices, according to researchers at Georgia Tech. Let’s face it, the time will come when we’ll all be complaining about the limitations of puny little 5G. But 5G’s seemingly interminable rollout should not preclude wildly premature and breathless anticipation over its successor. It uses a technology called a Rotman lens as a waveguide to focus multiple beams of millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation used in 5G into a coherent whole.To I know what you’re thinking.
Source: https://www.networkworld.com/article/3613336/report-5g-network-slicing-could-leave-flaws-for-bad-actors-to-exploit.html#tk.rss_all

The slices can be used for different purposes—say, mobile broadband for end-users and massive IoT connectivity—at the same time, without interfering with each other.To read this article in full, please click here 5G resources What is 5G? Fast wireless technology for enterprises and phones How 5G frequency affects range and speed Private 5G can solve some problems that Wi-Fi can’t Private 5G keeps Whirlpool driverless vehicles rolling 5G can make for cost-effective private backhaul CBRS can bring private 5G to enterprises Network slicing is central to realizing many of 5G’s more ambitious capabilities because it enables individual access points or base stations to subdivide networks into multiple logical sections—slices—effectively providing entirely separate networks for multiple uses. A 3D-printed antenna could turn high-frequency 5G signals into a wireless power source, potentially eliminating the need for batteries in low-power IoT devices, according to researchers at Georgia Tech. Let’s face it, the time will come when we’ll all be complaining about the limitations of puny little 5G. But 5G’s seemingly interminable rollout should not preclude wildly premature and breathless anticipation over its successor. 5G networks that incorporate legacy technology could be vulnerable to compromise via a lack of mapping between transport and application layers, according to a report by Ireland-based AdaptiveMobile Security. It uses a technology called a Rotman lens as a waveguide to focus multiple beams of millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation used in 5G into a coherent whole.To I know what you’re thinking.
Source: https://www.networkworld.com/article/3613074/5g-time-to-get-real-about-what-it-will-be-used-for.html#tk.rss_all

The slices can be used for different purposes—say, mobile broadband for end-users and massive IoT connectivity—at the same time, without interfering with each other.To read this article in full, please click here 5G resources What is 5G? Fast wireless technology for enterprises and phones How 5G frequency affects range and speed Private 5G can solve some problems that Wi-Fi can’t Private 5G keeps Whirlpool driverless vehicles rolling 5G can make for cost-effective private backhaul CBRS can bring private 5G to enterprises Network slicing is central to realizing many of 5G’s more ambitious capabilities because it enables individual access points or base stations to subdivide networks into multiple logical sections—slices—effectively providing entirely separate networks for multiple uses. The problem is that vendors want 5G to be revolutionary and transformational, rather than orderly. Second, that need to seem revolutionary has pushed 5G stories to the boundaries of sensibility.To Let’s face it, the time will come when we’ll all be complaining about the limitations of puny little 5G. But 5G’s seemingly interminable rollout should not preclude wildly premature and breathless anticipation over its successor. 5G networks that incorporate legacy technology could be vulnerable to compromise via a lack of mapping between transport and application layers, according to a report by Ireland-based AdaptiveMobile Security. I know what you’re thinking.
Source: https://www.networkworld.com/article/3613836/5g-mm-wave-signals-could-power-self-charging-iot-devices.html#tk.rss_all

The slices can be used for different purposes—say, mobile broadband for end-users and massive IoT connectivity—at the same time, without interfering with each other.To read this article in full, please click here 5G resources What is 5G? Fast wireless technology for enterprises and phones How 5G frequency affects range and speed Private 5G can solve some problems that Wi-Fi can’t Private 5G keeps Whirlpool driverless vehicles rolling 5G can make for cost-effective private backhaul CBRS can bring private 5G to enterprises Network slicing is central to realizing many of 5G’s more ambitious capabilities because it enables individual access points or base stations to subdivide networks into multiple logical sections—slices—effectively providing entirely separate networks for multiple uses. The problem is that vendors want 5G to be revolutionary and transformational, rather than orderly. Second, that need to seem revolutionary has pushed 5G stories to the boundaries of sensibility.To A 3D-printed antenna could turn high-frequency 5G signals into a wireless power source, potentially eliminating the need for batteries in low-power IoT devices, according to researchers at Georgia Tech. 5G networks that incorporate legacy technology could be vulnerable to compromise via a lack of mapping between transport and application layers, according to a report by Ireland-based AdaptiveMobile Security. It uses a technology called a Rotman lens as a waveguide to focus multiple beams of millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation used in 5G into a coherent whole.To
Source: https://www.networkworld.com/article/3613116/6g-vast-and-mysterious-promises.html#tk.rss_all

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